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04

Apr

todayinhistory:

April 4th 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. killed

On this day in 1968, civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee aged just 39. The Baptist minister from Georgia first came to national attention for his leadership of the Montgomery Bus Boycott in 1955. This event is considered by many the beginning of the Civil Rights Movement, which saw a national fight against discrimination suffered by African-Americans. King was one of many leaders, but became the face of the movement for his nonviolent tactics and powerful oratory. In 1963, during the March on Washington, King delivered the crowning speech of the struggle - the ‘I have a dream’ speech. Beyond his role in combating racial inequality, King also focused on tackling poverty and advocating peace, especially during the Vietnam War. On April 4th 1968, King was shot and killed by James Earl Ray. He lived to see the legislative achievements of the movement - the 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act - but tragically was unable to continue the push for full equality. The movement King set in motion continues to be fought today; the United States is still not a completely equal society and systemic discrimination persists. However thanks to Martin Luther King, America is closer to fulfilling King’s dream of a truly free and equal society.

02

Apr

Harvard discovers three of its library books are bound in human flesh

25

Feb

todayinhistory:

February 25th 1870: Hiram Rhodes Revels inaugurated

On this day in 1870 Hiram Rhodes Revels, the first African-American to sit in Congress, was inaugurated into the Senate. Before he was elected to the Senate, Revels was a Methodist minister and led black Union regiments during the Civil War. Revels gained his post after the Mississippi state legislature voted for Revels to fill one of the state’s Senate seats which had been vacant since Mississippi seceded. His appointment was initially resisted by the United States Senate, and his legitimacy was debated for several days. On February 25th, the Senate voted to allow Revels to take up his seat, with only Republicans voting for him and Democrats against. His inauguration that day received a standing ovation as the Senate witnessed the first African-American member of Congress joining their ranks. Revels served one term in the Senate, consistently pushing for racial equality, until he resigned in 1871 to become a college president.

07

Feb

9 'Facts' About History You Thought Were True, But Definitely Aren't

24

Dec

demons:

Marines gather near a bunker for Christmas services, December 1966

demons:

Marines gather near a bunker for Christmas services, December 1966

27

Nov

foundingfathersfbconvos:

07nathalie:

MT Rushmore done right!

If I was a historical person reenactor, I would do this.

foundingfathersfbconvos:

07nathalie:

MT Rushmore done right!

If I was a historical person reenactor, I would do this.

(Source: allthingslincoln)

26

Nov

todayinhistory:

November 26th 1922: Tutankhamun’s tomb opened

On this day in 1922, archaeologist Howard Carter and his financer Lord Carnarvon became the first people to enter the tomb of Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun in over 3000 years. On 26th November, Carter made the famous “tiny breach in the top left hand corner” of the doorway, and was able to peer into the antechamber by the light of a candle and see that many of the gold and ebony treasures were still in place. When Carnarvon asked “Can you see anything?”, Carter replied: “Yes, wonderful things.” The first item was removed from the tomb on December 27th and on February 16th 1923, the Burial Chamber was oficially opened, where the team found the sarcophagus and the mummified remains of Tutankhamun.

19

Nov

Today is the 150th Anniversary of President Lincoln’s November 19th, 1863 Gettysburg Address. These images are the earliest known copy of his speech.

"The first page is on White House (then Executive Mansion) stationery, lending strong support to the theory that it was drafted in Washington, D.C. But the second page is on what has been loosely described as foolscap, suggesting that Lincoln was not fully satisfied with the final paragraph of the Address and rewrote that passage in Gettysburg"

(from the Library of Congress.)

An old newspaper photo (1881) of the Union School House in New London, CT, where Nathan Hale was once a teacher.

An old newspaper photo (1881) of the Union School House in New London, CT, where Nathan Hale was once a teacher.

18

Nov

demons:

President Lyndon B. Johnson listening to a tape sent by Captain Charles Robb, his son-in-law, from Vietnam, July 1968

demons:

President Lyndon B. Johnson listening to a tape sent by Captain Charles Robb, his son-in-law, from Vietnam, July 1968